FAQ’S

How can I qualify for Canadian permanent residence? / What are the application categories?
Can I apply for immigration while in Canada on a visitor’s visa?
What are the conditions imposed on the Entrepreneur and his/her obligations after landing in   Canada?
How long does it take a landed Immigrant Entrepreneur to remove his or her terms and conditions?
What are the regulatory stipulations imposed on an Immigrant Investor before and after landing?
How can my relatives immigrate to Canada?
How is the selection process different in Quebec?
Which family members can be included in the principal applicant’s immigration application?
Who must attend an interview?
What types of questions do they ask in the interview? How can I prepare for my interview?
What is the job market like in Canada?
Do professional and/or tradespeople need registration and licensing to work in Canada?
Will my status in Canada mean that I can visit and work in the United States?
How much money do I need to settle in Canada?
Why do I need a medical examination to come to Canada?
Can I use my own doctor to do the medical examination?
Do I submit a police clearance?
When can I obtain Canadian citizenship?

 

...Back To Top...

Q. How can I qualify for Canadian permanent residence? What are the application categories?

There are a number of categories in which you may apply for Canadian permanent residence. Each category has various assessment requirements and conditions. The categories are explained in the Canadian Immigration section of this Web site.

...Back To Top...

Q. Can I apply for immigration while in Canada on a visitor’s visa?

Unless you are the spouse of a Canadian permanent resident or citizen (or for some other humanitarian reason), you must send you application to a visa office abroad. If your visitor’s visa expires, then you must either leave Canada or apply for an extension.

...Back To Top...

Q. What are the conditions imposed on the Entrepreneur and his/her obligations after landing in Canada ?

The Entrepreneur must meet certain terms and conditions as explained in the Canadian Immigration Business Category section of this Web site. Periodic reports are required by Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to ensure that such stipulations are met.

...Back To Top...

Q. How long does it take a landed Entrepreneur Immigrant to remove his or her terms and conditions?

The amount of time varies with the workload of the Canadian immigration centre responsible for the region in which the Immigrant Entrepreneur is doing business. An Entrepreneur who has established, purchased or made substantial investment in a business which meets all the provincial guidelines for the removal of terms and conditions does not need to wait until they have been in Canada for two years in order to apply for such conditions to be removed. The best way to accelerate the application process is to ensure all forms are complete and thorough, and that all important details of the business are clearly explained.

...Back To Top...

Q. What are the regulatory stipulations imposed on an Immigrant Investor before and after landing?

Before the Investor’s immigration visa is issued, the Investor must transfer his funds to Canada and sign an investment agreement. The duration of the investment is five years, during which the funds cannot be withdrawn. However, the Investor’s permanent residence status after landing is non-conditional to the extent the invested funds will not be under his/her control.

...Back To Top...

Q. How can my relatives immigrate to Canada?

People wishing to immigrate to Canada can also apply under the Family Class category. Family Class applicants may be eligible to immigrate on the basis of the close family relationship that they have with a Canadian citizen or permanent resident who is an eligible sponsor. Spouses and parents — who can bring with them their dependent children, such as the brothers and sisters of the sponsor — are eligible to apply, and may qualify. The sponsor needs to have a certain minimum income to be eligible to sponsor. This income threshold does not apply for those who wish to sponsor a spouse. The sponsor must sign an agreement pledging to take care of all the financial needs of the person he/she is sponsoring for a period of 10 years.

...Back To Top...

Q. How is the selection process different in Quebec?

The province of Quebec maintains its own immigration policy and procedures. The independent immigrant is also assessed on a points system. Applicants proficient in French are preferred. The Quebec list of open occupations is shorter than that of the Federal system. However, Quebec allows applicants to qualify for immigration even if their professions are not in demand, provided that their potential employability/professional mobility is deemed sufficient. Points are also allocated for your spouse’s attributes, the number of your children and your adaptability factors. Knowledge about Quebec, a visit to the province or the presence of a relative in Quebec will earn you extra points. It is not necessarily more difficult to immigrate to Quebec, but the process is different.

...Back To Top...

Q. Which family members can be included in the principal applicant’s immigration application?

Your application can include your spouse and any unmarried children under the age of 19 years. Under special circumstances, certain children over 19 years of age may be considered dependants.
According to Canadian immigration regulations, a dependent child (whether natural or adopted) of the principal applicant or spouse/partner may be included in the application for permanent residence, if s/he:
is less than 19 years of age and unmarried;

...Back To Top...

Q. Who must attend an interview?

Interviews for the principal applicant and his/her adult dependants are generally required; however, they can be occasionally waived. If the applicant either shows that they have sufficient units to pass, or insufficient units with no chance of accumulating more in an interview, they are not likely to be interviewed. The interview is used to verify the information provided in the application, to assess the applicants’ command of English/French languages, and to determine the personal suitability of applicants to successfully settle in Canada.

...Back To Top...

Q. What types of questions do they ask in the interview? How can I prepare for my interview?

The interview is used to verify the information on your application, to confirm you have sufficient funds to settle in Canada, to determine personal suitability (i.e. motivation, initiative, resourcefulness), and to counsel applicants if they are successful. Prior to your interview, spend time learning more about Canada and the Canadian labour market (i.e. become familiar with job opportunities for you, and with the qualifications and language ability they require). We will guide you in every possible way and advise you to make your interview a success.

...Back To Top...

Q. What is the job market like in Canada? What is the demand for my particular occupation?

Skilled applicants, especially in the areas of high technology, the sciences, finance and engineering, should be able to find gratifying and rewarding positions in Canada with relative ease. To gain a better understanding of Canada’s job market, it is recommended that you look through the ‘careers’ section of any major Canadian newspaper or job websites.

...Back To Top...

Q. Do professional and/or trades people need registration and licensing to work in Canada?

Many occupations in Canada require registration, licensing or membership in a professional or trade association. Applicants intending to work in these occupations will need to prove they hold sufficient credentials to meet professional or trade licensing requirements so they may follow their occupation in Canada. We can research whether or not your occupation requires licensing, and then have your qualifications and experience assessed.

...Back To Top...

Q. Will my status in Canada mean that I can visit and work in the United States?

Citizens of Canada are not required to obtain visas to enter the U.S., and may be eligible for employment in the U.S. under the NAFTA agreement. Some permanent residents of Canada such as those who are citizens of Commonwealth countries may not need visas to travel in the United States. The rest of the permanent residents, generally speaking, must provide evidence that they do not intend to immigrate to the U.S., which could be met by providing evidence of their attachment to Canada, such as a letter of employment or proof that they are full-time students in Canada.

...Back To Top...

Q. How much money do I need to settle in Canada?

You must have sufficient funds to cover your expenses for the first 6 months after your landing in Canada until you find a job or start generating an income. The cost of living in Canada varies from city to city, but the recommended funds to settle for independent immigrants is C $10,000 for an individual, and at least an extra $2,000-$3000 per dependant. Please note that this is just an estimate and the costs may vary for each individual.

...Back To Top...

Q. Why do I need a medical examination to come to Canada?

You and your dependants, whether accompanying you or not, must pass a medical examination in accordance with the Canadian immigration regulations. An applicant is inadmissible if he presents a health risk or danger to Canadians, or if he is likely to place an excessive demand on Canada’s health care system and social services.

...Back To Top...

Q. Can I use my own doctor to do the medical examination?

No. The examination must be done by an approved doctor on Canada’s list of Designated Medical Physicians. We will assist you in getting your medical done from an approved doctor.

...Back To Top...

Q. Do I submit a police clearance?

Yes. You must submit a police clearance for you and your dependants from every country where you have resided for more than six months on attaining 18 yrs of age.

...Back To Top...

Q. When can I obtain Canadian citizenship?

Adult applicants must be physically present in Canada for at least 1,460 days (four years) during the six years before the date of their application, and they must be physically present in Canada for at least 183 days in each of four calendar years within the qualifying period. 

...Back To Top...

For an assessment of your case, please Contact Us today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.